MIND/BODY CONNECTION

Proper Pulse

Becky Holman

So many people talk about resting heart rate, but what’s normal? Although it varies from individual to individual, between 60 and 80 beats a minute is considered normal and average—no matter what your age or sex.

If you’re conditioned aerobically, your resting heart rate may be 50 to 60 beats per minute, and if you’re really a cardio fiend or a triathlete, you may have a resting pulse of as low as 40 beats every 60 seconds.

By the way, a high resting pulse upon awakening can mean you’re overstressed and perhaps overtrained.


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The Hepburn Routine

Bill Starr

The Hepburn Routine

Last month I presented a workout aimed primarily at beginners and those who want to include some quick lifts in their routines, a program I learned from Sid Henry of Dallas. This month’s routine is of an entirely different nature and is meant for advanced strength athletes. Don’t even consider trying it unless you’ve spent several years in serious strength training. You must establish a solid base before this routine will bear fruit.

Breakout Foods

Jerry Brainum

Breakout Foods

In the past those prone to acne, particularly teenagers, were advised to avoid high-fat foods and chocolate because they were thought to cause acne lesions. Subsequent research, however, proved those ideas to be incorrect. Acne is caused by increased bacterial activity in the skin coupled with increased secretion of sebum, which comes from the skin’s sebaceous glands. Excess sebum blocks the sebaceous glands, and the bacteria that feed on it produce substances that lead to skin inflammation.

Drink On More Muscle

Jerry Brainum

Drink On More Muscle

One frequent lament of over-35 bodybuilders is that it seems harder to build muscle as you age. Various physiological mechanisms have been offered to explain that, such as changes in anabolic hormone levels and a decreased communication between muscles and the central nervous system. An overlooked factor that likely plays a major role is cortisol control.

Vacuum Your Waist

Frank Zane

Vacuum Your Waist

 Watching the ’03 Arnold Classic men’s pro physique competition, Reg Park, who was sitting next to me, remarked that just about every contestant had a big waist. “Guess it’s not only me who notices this,” I thought. “Whatever happened to the quest for a small waist?” The distended gut, or “blabs” syndrome, is commonplace among today’s top competitors. In their endeavor to get as big as possible by eating vast amounts of food and engaging in excessive pharmaceutical enhancement, they’ve caused everything to grow to colossal size, including their waistlines. True, there are a few exceptions—Shawn Ray, Kevin Levrone, Dexter Jackson and Chris Cormier. But those guys aren’t winning. I wonder what might happen if the stomach vacuum pose were made mandatory.

Fat-Burn Biology    Part 2

Ori Hofmekler with Marc Salzman

Fat-Burn Biology    Part 2

WARNING: This article is for reference and informational purposes only and is in no way intended as medical counseling or advice. The information contained herein should not be used to treat, diagnose or prevent any disease or medical condition. The activities, physical or otherwise, described herein for informational purposes may be too strenuous or dangerous for some people, and readers should consult a physician before engaging in them. The publication, author, writer and Warrior Diet LLC shall have neither liability nor responsibility to any person or entity with respect to any loss, damage or injury caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by the information contained in this article.