TRAIN TO GAIN

Hyperplasia a Get-Big Reality?

John Hansen

Hyperplasia occurs when the number of muscle cells increases as a response to exercise. Most of the research on it has used animals—such as birds, rats and cats—as subjects. Jose Antonio, Ph.D., performed a study on a bird in which he used weights to progressively overload one wing and stretch the anterior latissimus dorsi muscle. The overload scheme started with a weight that was 10 percent of the bird’s weight and increased it by 5 percent up to 35 percent. Two days of rest preceded an increase in weight. After 28 stretch days, the study recorded the greatest gains in muscle mass ever in an animal or human model of tension-induced overload—a 334 percent increase in muscle mass with a 90 percent increase in fiber number.

[Note: Antonio’s research may give even more credence to the practice of using stretch-position exercises, like flyes for chest, and end-of-set partials in the semistretched position at positive failure, as described in the item below, for faster mass increases.]

 

Editor’s note: Natural Bodybuilding is available from Home Gym Warehouse for $21.95 plus shipping and handling. To order call (800) 447-0008 or visit www.Home-Gym.com.


Share/Bookmark
Tags:

High-Fiber Movement

Becky Holman

High-Fiber Movement

It was a massive study by the British Medical Research Council’s Dunn Human Nutrition Unit in Cambridge, England. It involved more than a half-million people in 10 European countries, and the big finding was that no matter the food source, fiber protects against bowel cancer, which kills almost 1 million people in the world each year.

Five servings of fruits and veggies a day is recommended. So what’s a low-carb dieter to do? Be sure to take a fiber supplement and get plenty of low-calorie cruciferous veggies like broccoli. And low-cal, low-glycemic-index fruits like apples won’t hurt either.

Three-Days-a-Week Get-Big Program

John Hansen

Three-Days-a-Week Get-Big Program

Q: I’ve watched your DVD “Real Muscle” a few times now and wanted to ask you if it’s possible to build a big natural physique by training with weights only three times a week on a Monday-Wednesday-Friday push/leg/pull split. That would work nicely with my college schedule right now, but I’m afraid I’d be undertraining. In your book you talk about doing the three-day split with a total of five workouts a week. That’s why I’m questioning the three-days-a-week split. I’m 20 years old and have been training for about three years on and off.

Sweet-Spot Size Surge

Steve Holman and Jonathan Lawson

Sweet-Spot Size Surge

Don’t shrug off Larry Scott’s “Pain Zone” segment on this page as hype. If you’ve been receiving our IM e-zine and/or reading our “Train, Eat, Grow” series in this magazine, you know that we’ve recently made some incredible gains using something similar to Scott’s zone attack. We call it X-Rep training, which is merely finding the max-force point of each exercise and then firing out partials at the end of a full-range set to failure.

Age-old Adaptations

Richard A. Winett

Age-old Adaptations

Like it or not, as you get older there’s some loss of strength and less ability to quickly recover from injuries and the microtrauma of training. You have to put health and safety first in your training and go by the credo, “Do no harm.”

We rarely think, however, that the adaptations we must make can lead us in directions that are more productive than what we’d been doing for years.

Ode to the Squat

Dale Clark

Ode to the Squat

Down the road, in a gym far away

A young man was heard to say,

“No matter what I do, my legs won’t grow!”

He tried leg extensions, leg curls, leg presses too.

Trying to cheat, these sissy workouts he’d do!

From the corner of the gym where the big guys train,

Through a cloud of chalk and the midst of pain,