MIND/BODY CONNECTION

Home-Gym Hardware

Steve Holman

In the early 1900s there was an athletic German named Heinrich Steinborn who was serving in the German navy. World War I was going full force, and, as chance would have it, Heinrich’s ship was captured off the coast of Australia and brought to port there. As a prisoner of war Heinrich had nothing to do but work out, think about working out and then work out some more. He quickly outgrew the meager equipment in the compound, and before long he was in dire need of some heavier weight.

One day while he was thinking about his predicament, he learned that some trees were being cut nearby to clear some land. Steinborn immediately had a brainstorm. He obtained permission, selected two of the largest stumps that looked to be equal in weight and fashioned a heavy barbell by securing one to each side of a bar. Heinrich used the weight for some heavy-duty workouts and became the stongest man around—most of the other men could hardly budge the homemade barbell, much less lift it.

Later in his life he moved to America, achieved fame for his tremendous feats of strength and became known as the great strongman “Milo” Steinborn, but he never forgot that homemade Australian barbell. It had a special place in his heart because it kept him training and was a symbol of his ingenuity and strength.

Today, we’re lucky; we don’t have to build barbells out of tree stumps as Milo did just to get a decent workout. With the growing popularity of weight training, the sporting goods stores are overflowing with options for setting up a home gym.

One of the best is the PowerBlock selectorized dumbbell set. Pair it with an adjustable bench, and you’ve got a killer home gym. From dumbbell squats to incline dumbbell presses to dumbbell rows, you can work every body-part. It’s a basic setup, but it’s a great place to start. Of course, in the spirit of Milo, your gains will be limited only by your ingenuity.

Editor’s note: The PowerBlock selectorized dumbbell set is available from Home Gym Warehouse, (800) 447-0008 or visit www.Home-Gym.com.


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Food Fight Infusion

Becky Holman

Food Fight Infusion

Did you know that stealth food allergies are believed to affect about 60 percent of the population? They can cause everything from sinus congestion to headaches to joint pain to irritable bowel syndrome to flatulence, and they can even do a number on your head. For example, some researchers believe food allergies are the cause of many cases of attention-deficit disorder—a.k.a. ADD. Food allergies can be either inherited or come on because of continual exposure to the same foods. Bodybuilders tend to eat the same things over and over for months or even years on end, so they are susceptible. Milk, corn and wheat are the most common culprits, but almost any food can cause a reaction in some people. If you suspect food allergies are at the root of your constant indigestion or any of the other symptoms mentioned, see your doctor or an allergist for a simple blood screening.

The Essential Nothingness of Weight Training

Dave Draper

The Essential Nothingness of Weight Training

I’m looking out a narrow window beside my desk that views a steep wooded hillside. Two men are hard at work chipping fallen branches and reducing stout limbs to firewood, worthy tasks rendering valuable fuel for the winter.

They make me weary. Chain saw buzzing, chipper grinding, arms full, backs loaded, up and down, back and forth. I’m humbled.

Wendy Lucas

Ian Sitren

Wendy Lucas

You work hard at being fit and looking good, imagining that one day you could be seen in the pages of a magazine like IRON MAN. That and more have been a dream of Wendy Lucas. The 24-year-old Southern Californian started lifting at 13 and was hooked. She began dreaming about being a fitness model and an inspiration to others.

Alcohol—How Much Is Too Much?

Becky Holman

Alcohol—How Much Is Too Much?

Studies have shown that drinking alcohol can be good for you—in moderation. It improves HDL, the good cholesterol, and also opens up the blood vessels—that is, fosters vasodilation. The question is, How much alcohol is good? The answer is one drink a day for women and two for men. One drink equals five ounces of wine, one-fifth ounce of liquor or a 12-ounce beer. Most people exceed those amounts, which can negate any health benefit and actually be detrimental to health and body composition—as in added bodyfat.

Mess Equals Stress

Becky Holman

Mess Equals Stress

According to Daryn Eller in “Make Sense of Home Healing” in the February ’09 Prevention, “Experts suggest that humans are hardwired to seek out spaciousness, harking back to our ancestors’ need to flee predators.” That may explain why clutter creates anxiety. In other words, mess leads to stress. It pays to keep a fairly neat environment, and cleaning can actually be therapeutic. Researchers recently found that people who did 20 minutes of housework were less anxious and depressed.