CRITICAL MASS

Hardgainer Heresy

Steve Holman

Page 2

Another route is Rehan Jalali’s routine in the “Success Story” on page 172. He did only five or so sets per bodypart, training each muscle once every seven days (it’s really more if you include indirect work); however, he also did interval sprinting three days a week, which is very demanding and which can produce great metabolic strides. He coaxed his metabolism out of the hardgainer doldrums, and with a two-on/one-off weight-training regimen he got enough stimulation in each muscle to trigger growth. Would he have done so well without the sprinting? Very doubtful.

Keep in mind that it’s my job to tell you the truth and what I’ve seen work for hardgainers. I’m not here to tell you what you want to hear, like you should only train twice a week for 30 minutes a workout. That’s like giving up. Or to let you off the hook with an excuse like bad genetics. Whatever your genetics, you can make gains if you’re willing to experiment with many different kinds of routines and understand exactly what makes hardgainers hardgainers in the first place. Think, understand and experiment, and soon you’ll drop that hardgainer tag like a bad habit—or you’ll at least be noticed as someone who works out and has muscles, even in clothes.

[Note: Holman analyzes the hardgainer type and discusses a number of solutions, including the Hardgainer Volume/Intensity-Fusion Routine, in the new Hardgainer Size Surge. It’s available for $9.95 plus shipping by calling 1-800-447-0008.]

Q: Should I take Cort-Bloc before bed—around 10:30 p.m.—even though I lift at 4 p.m.? I was also thinking about using RecoverX as my postworkout drink instead of [a meal replacement]. What do you think?

A: If you’re only going to take Cort-Bloc once, I suggest taking it about 20 minutes before you train—two to four capsules. If you can afford to take a second dose, even only one or two capsules, use it again before bed. Preworkout, however, is the most important time.

As for your second question, yes, I think RecoverX is the best postworkout supplement you can use because it has both fast carbs and fast protein in the right proportion—60 grams of carbs to 40 grams of protein. After you train, you have a need for speed. If you use a standard meal replacement or protein powder with a casein-whey mix, it can slow down the absorption. You want the fastest entry into the bloodstream possible, and RecoverX provides that by including hydrolyzed whey, a so-called predigested form that’s the fastest protein available.


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Choose to Snooze

Becky Holman

Choose to Snooze

Bodybuilders know that more restful sleep means better workouts, more growth hormone and a stronger immune system. So what’s an insomniac to do? While serious sleep disorders may require a physician’s attention, you can try some techniques to improve your sleep. These tips are from the Web site Webmd.com:

Big-Time Arm Training

Christopher Pennington

Big-Time Arm Training

Most people would agree that arm day is the one workout day above all others that gets them excited about going to the gym. There’s nothing like feeling your biceps engorged with blood after you perform a hard set of curls. The problem with so many arm-training routines, however, is that they don’t work forever. Unfortunately, gains eventually come to an end. Fortunately, it’s not a permanent situation. The fact is that after a while the usual arm routine just doesn’t get it done anymore. At that point you need a new training stimulus to jolt further growth. Once you’ve shaken things up a bit, you can return to your previous program and expect new gains in size and strength. Let’s look at several important but often overlooked aspects of a successful arm routine.

Muscle-Training Program 72

Steve Holman and Jonathan Lawson

Muscle-Training Program 72

To force a muscle to grow, you must change something in your workout for that bodypart. Growth is an adaption to new stress. It used to be so easy in the beginning, remember? All you had to do was keep adding weight to the bar—and you could do that at almost every workout. But after years of training, poundage increases are few and far between. Just ask Mr. Olympia Ronnie Coleman.

Innovations in Iron

Randall Strossen, Ph.D.

Innovations in Iron

One of the great myths in training, and in many other human endeavors, is that you make progress inch by inch, ounce by ounce, implying that if you’re on the right course, you can be assured of holding a steady course to your goal. It’s an enticing idea. Unfortunately, evidence indicates that the concept is little more than a fairy tale. In reality, progress in the weight room, just as in other activities, tends to come—when it comes—in leaps and bounds, and the path upward has more dips, twists and level spots than most people believe.

Bag and Gag?

Becky Holman

Bag and Gag?

To build muscle you have to eat often, and that usually means bodybuilders carry food with them wherever they go. One of the big problems can be spoilage—and nobody likes choking down a heaping spoonful of rancid cottage cheese. Here are a few tips from the Food Safety and Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture for keeping your brown-bag snacks safe and tasty: