MIND/BODY CONNECTION

Brains and Beer

Becky Holman

Despite television’s reputation as the “idiot box,” you can find some pretty clever stuff floating through the airwaves. Case in point, Cliff chatting to Norm at the bar on “Cheers”:

“Well, you see, Norm, it’s like this: A herd of buffalo can only move as fast as the slowest buffalo. And when the herd is hunted, it is the slowest and weakest ones at the back that are killed first. This natural selection is good for the herd as a whole, because the general speed and health of the whole group keeps improving by the regular killing of the weakest members. In much the same way, the human brain can only operate as fast as the slowest brain cells. Now, as we know, excessive intake of alcohol kills brain cells. But, naturally, it attacks the slowest and weakest brain cells first. In this way, regular consumption of beer eliminates the weaker brain cells, making the brain a faster and more efficient machine. And that, Norm, is why you always feel smarter after a few beers.”


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Jack Energy, Whack Disease

Becky Holman

Jack Energy, Whack Disease

You may have read in IRON MAN that more than 1,000 studies show a link between a lower risk of cancer and vitamin D. It’s estimated that low levels of vitamin D may produce up to a 70 percent increase in the risk for prostate cancer and double the risk for colon cancer. Now a new Dutch study suggests that a vitamin D deficiency can lead to sluggishness, especially in older people.

Abner S. Brady

David Chapman

Abner S. Brady

The history of early American weight training is sketchy at best. A few figures have been well publicized, but the vast majority of those athletic pioneers have been forgotten. One amazing but little-known figure in the history of sport was Abner S. Brady. Unfortunately, there’s almost no information on him or his contributions. A few facts can be pieced together, and they prove that he was a weight trainer who was decades ahead of most of his contemporaries.

In Charge of Champions

Randall Strossen

In Charge of Champions

Imagine this: Your mission is to produce a stunning array of world champions in the highly competitive arena of Olympic-style weightlifting, and you have at your disposal just about whatever you might want to help reach your goal. For starters, there’s no need to limit your athlete pool to a scanty group of scrawny walk-ins better suited to watching slow-pitch softball than trying to lift several times their bodyweight from the ground to arm’s length overhead. You have highly refined scouting tools, and you’re not kidding about this evaluation business. You might test 100,000 prospects and identify perhaps 70 as having enough potential to give your program a try. What you end up with is a group of athletes who have the ability to lift weights most of us can barely roll across the floor—think of relatively slender 150-pound guys who can lift more than 350 pounds from the floor to overhead, and you’ll get the picture.

About Weight Training

Dave Draper

About Weight Training

I might miss the training topics vital to you, but at least—here comes a laughable presumption—I stir up your thoughts. In hopes of being more specific, let’s begin our brief time together from another angle. What is it about your training that bothers you the most? What perplexes you, distresses and disturbs you, disappoints you? What gets in your way, slows you down, prevents you from making progress—losing weight, building muscle, increasing strength and gaining shape? How about energy, endurance and general conditioning?

Home-Gym Hardware

Steve Holman

Home-Gym Hardware

In the early 1900s there was an athletic German named Heinrich Steinborn who was serving in the German navy. World War I was going full force, and, as chance would have it, Heinrich’s ship was captured off the coast of Australia and brought to port there. As a prisoner of war Heinrich had nothing to do but work out, think about working out and then work out some more. He quickly outgrew the meager equipment in the compound, and before long he was in dire need of some heavier weight.