MIND/BODY CONNECTION

Blood Port

Becky Holman

Here’s a brief from Kenneth R. Kensey, M.D., coauthor of The Blood Thinner Cure: A Revolutionary Seven-Step Lifestyle Plan for Stopping Heart Disease and Stroke: “I recommend that men and postmenopausal women donate a pint of blood every eight weeks—the maximum allowed by the American Red Cross. According to a study conducted in Finland, men who donated blood were up to 10 times less likely to have a heart attack than men who didn’t.”


Share/Bookmark
Tags:

The Juice vs. the Sauce

Daniel Curtis

The Juice vs. the Sauce

 

The health benefits of imbibing limited amounts of alcohol have gotten a lot of media coverage, especially the heart-health benefits. Studies have shown that up to two drinks for a man and one for a woman each day can have a good effect on your heart. Does that mean if you don’t drink you should start?

Size Matters—or Does it?

Jerry Brainum

Size Matters—or Does it?

The many anxieties a man faces include how to make more money, how to avoid premature death and whether his penis is big enough. Many a man links the size of his penis to an overall concept of masculinity, since—let’s face it—what’s more representative of a man than that organ? Women who face the same problem with their breasts can simply make an appointment with a local plastic surgeon for breast implants.

Losers Live It Up!

Becky Holman

Losers Live It Up!

After completing a nine-year study of 6,391 overweight and obese subjects, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that the death rate was 24 percent lower in those who tried to lose weight—even if they failed—than in those who didn’t try to diet down at all. Of course it’s better to actually lose the weight, but apparently the things people do when they try to drop some bodyfat—such as eat more fruits and veggies, scarf down fewer candy bars and exercise—increase longevity.

So pass the cottage cheese and hop on the treadmill.

Pressure Cooker

Daniel Curtis

Pressure Cooker

A new study suggests that losing weight has an effect similar to that of an ACE inhibitor, a commonly prescribed blood pressure drug. Subjects lost an average of 16 pounds, which reduced blood levels of pressure-building angiotension-converting enzyme by 18 percent, systolic pressure dropped by 10 points and diastolic by eight. If you lose just 5 to 10 percent of your bodyweight while on an ACE inhibitor, you may be able to decrease your dose or even stop the medication altogether—and save money—according to Joyce Harp, M.D., the author of the study.

Ease Disease With Weight Training

Daniel Curtis

Ease Disease With Weight Training

You’ve read in these pages how lifting weights can help those who have moderate kidney disease and moderate multiple sclerosis. Next is diabetes.

According to the March ’03 Prevention, “In a six-month study of 36 people, ages 60 to 80, with diabetes, Australian researchers found that those who ate a healthful diet and followed a weightlifting program had a three times greater decrease in average blood sugar levels than those who simply dieted. Such benefits were similar to those found with diabetic drugs. Plus, they lost moderate amounts of bodyfat.