Squat and the X Spot

Steve Holman

Squat and the X Spot

Q: I’m very impressed with The Ultimate Mass Workout [e-book]. I’ve been using X Rep religiously, and I’ve been very pleased with the results. I like to do full squats on the Smith machine, and, to get more stretch in my quads, I go below parallel. When I can’t get another full rep, I lower into a full squat and then execute my torturous X Reps down low—that’s possible on a Smith machine but not when using a free bar. I prefer the pulses at the bottom part of the squat due to the stretch I get in my quads. In the e-book you recommend X Reps on squats be performed more in the middle to top of the range of motion. I admit that X-Rep pulses at the parallel point of the squat are even harder than at the very bottom, but after pushing a set to exhaustion, it’s too tough to do X Reps near the middle—and I prefer the quad stretch I get when I pulse in the lowest range. I’ve been doing all of my X Reps near the bottom position on everything, including incline dumbbell presses (what a pump!). Is that a bad technique? Don’t your muscles generate the most force at maximum stretch?

Rinse for More Reps

Becky Holman

Rinse for More Reps

Ever feel that you’ve hit a wall about halfway through your workout? Rinse to revive and keep on repping. Researchers found that exercisers who merely rinsed their mouths with a sports drink trained harder afterward. Apparently, just the taste of carbs can spark the brain’s movement and pleasure centers to give you new energy, so if you’re watching calories, rinse but don’t swallow.

Weights vs. Cardio

Jerry Brainum

Weights vs. Cardio

The general prescription for losing bodyfat is to reduce your total calorie intake and increase your exercise. That makes your body use stored fat as an energy source. Most experts strongly recommend that you follow an exercise program when you undertake any type of weight-loss diet so you can maintain lean mass, which is mostly muscle. Dieting too stringently often results in muscle loss. Using diet alone to reduce bodyfat can lead to a loss of 50 percent bodyfat and 50 percent muscle.

Magnus Samuelsson

Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D.

Magnus Samuelsson

The word strongman has substantial cultural connections to Vikings, so if the image of a tall, blond Scandinavian pops into your head when you think “strongman,” you’re on the right track.
How about doorway-filling 6’6”, 330-pound Magnus Samuelsson? The Big Swede, who just happens to have won the World’s Strongest Man contest, has arms that are bigger than most men’s legs. Not only is he one of the most popular competitors on the professional strongman circuit, but he’s also known for having the strongest arms and hands in the world. Is this guy a poster boy for the strongman world or what?

FREE Ironman
IRON MAN Jul 2006

Table of Contents

IRON MAN  Mar 2005
IRON MAN  Dec 2007
IRON MAN  Jan 2008
IRON MAN  Jul 2005
IRON MAN  Aug 2008
IRON MAN  Feb 2008
IRON MAN  Jan 2009
IRON MAN  Apr 2007
IRON MAN  Aug 2005
IRON MAN  Oct 2008
IRON MAN  Sep 2008
IRON MAN  Jul 2007
IRON MAN  Aug 2006
IRON MAN  Mar 2008
IRON MAN  Mar 2009
IRON MAN  Feb 2005
IRON MAN  Oct 2006
IRON MAN  Oct 2007
IRON MAN  Sep 2007

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